Speakers

Blair headshotSteven N. Blair is a Professor at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Blair is a Fellow in the American College of Epidemiology, Society for Behavioral Medicine, American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, and National Academy of Kinesiology; and was elected to membership in the American Epidemiological Society. Dr. Blair is the recipient of three honorary doctoral degrees–Doctor Honoris Causa degree from the Free University of Brussels, Belgium; Doctor of Health Science degree from Lander University, U.S.; and Doctor of Science Honoris Causa, University of Bristol, UK.   He has received awards from many professional associations, including the Honor Award from the American College of Sports Medicine, the Population Science Research Award from the American Heart Association, and the Stunkard Lifetime Achievement Award from The Obesity society. He also was granted a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health, and is one of the few individuals outside the U.S. Public Health Service to be awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion. He has published over 650 papers and chapters in the scientific literature, and is one of the most highly cited exercise scientists, with over 47,000 citations to his work and a current annual citation rate of ~4,500. His h-Index is 100.

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Head Shot Summer 2015 MarcoMarco S. Boscolo has 14 years’ certified athletic training experience with patients in the elite, college, high school, and industrial setting. He has a special interest in empirically based core strength training. He has observed firsthand the effects of injury on the musculoskeletal system and their long and short-term effects on function. He currently works in the industrial medicine setting with industrial athletes who are trying to return to work after injury and who have been sedentary for typically 6 months or more. These types of patients typically face many long-term shoulder, back, and knee injuries, which have the potential to lead to disability. Marco regularly conducts weight lifting classes for high school students, women (Lifting for Ladies Nights), and older adults using empirical principles of core stiffness training to ensure safe lifting practices. Marco has conducted core fitness research in the high school setting to determine the feasibility of training core fitness in high school students. Marco will move back to the academic setting as an assistant professor of athletic training at California State University, Sacramento. He intends to conduct athletic training research in the non-traditional setting of industrial medicine, and optimization research design.

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Caspersen_CJ_OGH_PassportDr. Carl J. Caspersen, in 1983, began work at the CDC in the Behavioral Epidemiology and Evaluation Branch.  In 1998, he began a 9-year tenure as the Associate Director for Science for the Division of Diabetes Translation.  Dr. Caspersen had defined physical activity epidemiology as a scientific sub-specialty in 1989 and later outlined its applications to youth- and older adult populations.  Drawing from his interdisciplinary training, he has conducted research in:  physical activity epidemiology and surveillance; cardiovascular disease-, diabetes- and cancer epidemiology; aging populations; health policy; and community-based interventions.  Currently, his primary research centers on physical activity, diabetes and older adults.  Dr. Caspersen has also developed physical activity data collection and analytic methodologies for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, National Health Interview Survey, Yale Physical Activity Survey, and MONICA Optional Study of Physical Activity, becoming a world authority on physical activity assessment and surveillance.  He co-edited the Collection of Physical Activity Questionnaires which includes many of those questionnaires.  Dr. Caspersen helped to develop the Year 2000 Objectives, was an author and editor for the first Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, and provided scientific support for the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines.

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Abby King, Ph.D. is Professor of Health Research & Policy and Medicine (the division known as the Stanford Prevention Research Center) at Stanford University School of Medicine. A recipient of the Award for Outstanding Scientific Contributions in the Area of Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association, Dr. King’s research focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of public health interventions to reduce chronic disease risk and enhance health. Her current research focuses on expanding the reach and generalizability of evidence-based interventions through use of state-of-the-art communication technologies; community-based participatory research perspectives to address health disparities among disadvantaged populations; and policy-level approaches to health promotion. She has served on a number of government taskforces in the U.S. and abroad, including membership on the U.S. Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Scientific Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2020. Dr. King has been the recipient of a number of National Institutes of Health research grant awards. She is an elected member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, and Past President of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. In 2003, she received the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s Distinguished Research Mentor Award, and has twice received the Stanford Prevention Research Center’s Outstanding Contributions to Teaching Award.

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Dr. Michael L. Power received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1991. Dr. Power has been associated with the Smithsonian National Zoological Park since 1985. Dr. Power began working at the Research Department of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist in 1998. A major focus of his research has been the effects of nutrition on reproduction, especially the effects of both maternal under and over nutrition on birth outcome and eventual adult physiology of offspring. He has published multiple articles on digestion, energy metabolism, and milk composition in a variety of species. He has conducted studies on the knowledge and clinical practice of obstetrician-gynecologists on a number of topics, including their role in weight management and weight gain during pregnancy. Dr. Power is an organismal biologist with a strong evolutionary and comparative perspective. His focus is on whole animal physiology, and investigating the adaptive functions of animals’ responses to differing circumstances.

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Thomas N. Robinson, MD, MPH, is the Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor of Child Health at Stanford University. A Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine, in the Division of General Pediatrics and the Stanford Prevention Research Center, he also directs the Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford.

Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Solutions Science Lab at Stanford. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including innovative stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior to interventions for children and families in real world settings. He is published widely in the scientific literature and a frequent appointee to expert and advisory panels for leading national and international scientific and public health agencies and organizations. Dr. Robinson also teaches undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford, and practices Pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He received his B.S. and M.D. from Stanford University and his M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley.  He trained in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School.

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Gregory J. Welk is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at Iowa State University. He completed his Masters degree (MS) at the University of Iowa and his Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Prior to coming to ISU, Dr. Welk worked at the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research where he directed the Childhood and Adolescent Health Division. He has continued serving as the Scientific Director of the FITNESSGRAM program since coming to ISU to provide leadership on the application and utilization of FITNESSGRAM in schools.

Dr. Welk’s research interests focuses on the assessment and promotion of physical activity and fitness. He has conducted numerous studies on the reliability, validity and utility of different physical activity assessment techniques. He has worked to develop and refine approaches for calibrating subjective measures against more objective measures and has also worked to develop measurement tools for evaluation psychosocial correlates of physical activity and parenting practices related to obesity prevention. In addition to these measurement related projects, Dr. Welk is interested in participatory research designs that provide insights into how to build more sustainable, activity and health promotion programming in clinical, school, worksite and community settings.

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Dr. Whitt-Glover is President & CEO of Gramercy Research Group in Winston-Salem, NC. Gramercy Research Group’s mission is to positively impact and improve the lives of individuals and communities by addressing health and related issues. Dr. Whitt-Glover is currently involved in research studies designed to identify effective strategies to increase weight loss and weight gain prevention among African Americans, and to promote adherence to national recommendations for diet and physical activity. Her current research studies are being conducted in public schools and churches in Winston-Salem, NC. Dr. Whitt-Glover received her BA (Exercise Physiology, 1993) and MA (Exercise Physiology, 1996) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Ph.D. (Epidemiology, 1999) from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Whitt-Glover completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2000 – 2002) and has served on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2002 – 2003) and Wake Forest University School of Medicine (2003 – 2009).

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Dr. Vernikos, JoanJoan Vernikos, Ph.D. former Director of Life Sciences at NASA Headquarters (1993-2000) is a recognized leader in the field of the neuroregulation of the endocrine response to stress and is a pioneer of space medicine. Her extensive research led to the discovery of a revolutionary link between gravity and healthy aging (see Inactivity: its Physiology, co-edited with H Sandler in 1986). She holds a PhD in Pharmacology from the University of London, UK. She was recruited from Ohio State University for her stress expertise by NASA’s Ames Research Center in 1964. In parallel to stress research, she developed NASA’s ground research program using head-down bed rest to study the role of gravity in space and on Earth in men and women. In 2000 she left NASA, formed Thirdage LLC, to focus on communicating space health applications to the public through consulting, books, articles and public speaking. Her first such book, The G-Connection: Harness Gravity and Reverse Aging with a foreword from John Glenn, was published in English (2004), Greek (2004), Japanese (2006), Portuguese (2009) and Italian (2012). It received the International Academy of Astronautics 2009 Life Sciences Book Award. Stress Fitness for Seniors (2009) and Sitting Kills, Moving Heals (2011) followed.  Recognized with awards for her research, leadership and the promotion of women in Science, she is a Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association, the World Economic Forum (1995), a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and served on the NRC Space Studies Board (2004-2007). She holds three patents including one for a Human Powered Centrifuge.

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Dr. Ainsworth, Barbara EBarbara Ainsworth, Ph.D., MPH, FACSM, FNAK is a Regents’ Professor in the Exercise Science and Health Promotion Program and Associate Director for Health Promotion Faculties in School of Nutrition and Health Promotion at Arizona State University. Her research relates to physical activity and public health with focus on the assessment of physical activity in populations, the evaluation of physical activity questionnaires, and physical activity in women. Dr. Ainsworth is best known as the lead author for the Compendium of Physical Activities, an exhaustive list of the energy cost of human physical activities. Dr. Ainsworth is a Past President of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Academy of Kinesiology. She is a recipient of the ACSM Citation Award and the AAHPERD McKenzie Award. In 2015 she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition and has also has served on the President’s Council and the California Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sport Scientific Committees. She is a life-long advocate of active living and spends her free time maintaining her mini-ranch in Arizona, gardening, and hiking.

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Dr. Biddle, StuartDr. Stuart Biddle is Professor of Active Living & Public Health in ISEAL – Institute of Sport, Exercise & Active Living – at Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia. Previously he was Professor at Loughborough University, UK. His research adopts a behavioural medicine approach to the study of physical activity and sedentary behaviours with a particular interest in behaviour change and mental well-being. Stuart has published about 70 book chapters and more than 250 research papers, including over 60 on sedentary behaviour. He has a SCOPUS H-index of 50. In addition, he has authored and edited several books, including ‘Psychology of physical activity’, now in its 3rd edition. He is a Past President of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), and has contributed to governmental expert groups on sedentary behaviour and physical activity in the UK.

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Dr. Owen, Neville GProfessor Neville Owen heads the Behavioral Epidemiology Laboratory and is Program Head for Behavioural & Generational Change at the Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia. He is an Adjunct Professor in Medicine at Monash University and Honorary Professor of Population Health at the University of Queensland the University of Melbourne. He was previously Director of the Cancer Prevention Research Centre and Professor of Health Behavior in the School of Population Health at the University of Queensland. His research relates to the primary prevention of diabetes, heart disease and cancer, through identifying the health consequences and environmental determinants of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour – too little exercise and too much sitting. He is a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Senior Principal Research Fellow and currently leads his second five-year NHMRC Program Grant (Sitting less and moving more: population health research to understand and influence sedentary behaviour) and Centre of Research Excellence (Sitting time and chronic disease prevention –measurement, mechanisms and interventions). His research includes studying patterns and determinants of sitting time, the biological roles of postural change and muscle unloading, the potential benefits of interrupting prolonged sitting time, and ecological models to inform public health policies and programs.

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Dr. Cranz, GalenDr. Galen Cranz is Professor of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, a Ph.D. sociologist from the University of Chicago, and a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique.

The Chair: Rethinking Culture, Body and Design (1998) received the Environmental Design Research Association 2004 Achievement Award.  She lectures widely on body conscious design and has taught her unique approach at the Penland School of Crafts, Oregon College of Arts and Crafts, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, and Domus Academy of Design in Milan.  Her book has attracted media attention from New York Times, LA Times, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Seattle Times, Oregonian, Bay Guardian, Metropolis, Metropolitan Home, Toronto Globe and Mail, New Scientist (UK), WGN Radio Chicago, KGO-TV San Francisco, KRON-TV San Francisco, CNN, NPR’s Fresh Air, BBC, and ABC.  She holds two US patents for body conscious bathtub and chair.  She co-founded the international Association for Body Conscious Design.

More broadly, she teaches social and cultural approaches to architecture and urban design.  Emphasizing ethnography (Ethnography for Designers, Routledge, forthcoming March 2016), she brings users’ as well as creators’ perspectives to our understanding of the built environment.   She received the 2011 Career Award, EDRA’s highest award.

She wrote The Politics of Park Design: A History of Urban Parks in America (MIT 1982) and “Defining the Sustainable Park: A Fifth Model of Urban Parks” Landscape Journal (2004).  She lectures about urban parks, juries park design competitions, and been a member of several winning park design competition teams.

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James (Jim) Sallis, Active LIving Research, photographed in Philadelphia on 5/21/10 at a meeting event sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Participants were heads of programs funded by RWJF to work on the childhood obesity epidemic.

James F. Sallis, Ph.D is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at University of California, San Diego, and Director of Active Living Research.  His primary research interests are promoting physical activity and understanding policy and environmental influences on physical activity, sedentary behavior, nutrition, and obesity.  His health improvement programs have been studied and used in health care settings, schools, universities, and companies.  He is the author of over 600 scientific publications, on the editorial boards of several journals, and one of the world’s most cited authors in the social sciences.  Thomson-Reuters identified him as one of the world’s most creative scientific minds of 2014. His current focus is using research to inform policy and environmental changes that will increase physical activity and reduce childhood obesity. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the President’s  Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition and the Bloomberg-Manulife Prize for the Promotion of Active Health. He is President-elect of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. http://sallis.ucsd.edu/